Vogts earns JEA’s MJE certification

Todd Vogts, of Sterling College, recently earned Master Journalism Educator (MJE) status from the Journalism Education Association (JEA)1JEA is a nonprofit organization that encourages professional standards for journalism programs and student publications. It provides a forum for the interchange of ideas and sponsors workshops, contests and publications to promote and recognize excellence in student media..

Vogts will be honored on Nov. 10-13 at the Fall JEA/NSPA National High School Journalism Convention in St. Louis, Missouri.

According to the JEA website, “certification is a formal, academic certification to help scholastic media teachers and advisers demonstrate professional excellence in the field [. . .] The Master Journalism Educator certification, known as MJE, demonstrates the candidate’s lifelong commitment to learning and places the teacher-adviser in the elite among the profession.”

Vogts said he was honored to earn the MJE certification, which was announced via Twitter on Aug. 2.

“As the leading national organization focusing on scholastic media, I am proud to be listed among other dedicated educators that work to serve student journalists,” he said. “Earning this designation feels like recognition for the passion and work I put into my career as a journalism educator.”

To earn the MJE designation, Vogts had to earn and maintain his Certified Journalism Educator (CJE) status for at least five years. Then he had to pass an exam and complete an independent project designed to be a product shared with the greater scholastic journalism education community to benefit other JEA members.

For his project, Vogts wrote an in-depth and research-based article for JEADigitalMedia.org, which can be read here: NY Times Twitter ‘reset’ calls for curriculum review

That article is only the first he has contributed to the site, though.

“Since publishing my first piece, I have written another, and I have plans to continue to provide content as a way to further help the journalism education community,” Vogts said. “I just hope folks find my articles helpful.”

Though becoming an MJE is a professional highlight, Vogts pursued the certification because of the value student media provides to youth.

“Scholastic journalism presents so many opportunities for students,” he said. “I take so much pride and pleasure in being able to support students pursuing the skills and knowledge journalism programs provide. Journalism is crucial for our democracy, especially in these politically divisive times. This is because journalists help keep society informed so they can make the best decisions possible. That training begins at the student level, and it is vital.”

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    JEA is a nonprofit organization that encourages professional standards for journalism programs and student publications. It provides a forum for the interchange of ideas and sponsors workshops, contests and publications to promote and recognize excellence in student media.
About toddvogts 797 Articles
My name is Todd Vogts. I am an assistant professor of media. I like the color green, riding my motorcycle, and being with my family and friends. A good book is a perfect companion for me any time, and I'm a published author and journalist. Visit my website at www.toddvogts.com and follow me on Twitter at www.twitter.com/toddvogts.

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